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Musculoskeletal disorders among children and young people

New report by EU-OSHA

In many cases, MSD problems begin in childhood, when inappropriate postures are combined with little sports activity. Suffering from musculoskeletal pain in childhood or adolescence increases the risk of having it as an adult.

In many cases, MSD problems begin in childhood, when inappropriate postures are combined with little sports activity. Suffering from musculoskeletal pain in childhood or adolescence increases the risk of having it as an adult.
A new report "Musculoskeletal disorders among children and young people: prevalence, risk factors, preventive measures" by the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA) highlights these problems. This report shows how important it is to adopt a ‘life course’ approach to studying musculoskeletal conditions and musculoskeletal health. Its adoption improves prevention for all workers (young and older), and reduces the damage to workers’ health while limiting early exit from work and improving the sustainability of work in jobs that have high physical demands. In this context, the lifelong impact of musculoskeletal pain needs to be considered.
There are several reasons for the rather high prevalence rates in children and young people. MSDs can be caused by acquired, individual or congenital risk factors. Most of the acquired risk factors, i.e. physical, psychological, socioeconomic and environmental risk factors, are largely preventable.
Established interventions to prevent or reduce MSDs involve education, physical exercises, manipulative therapy and ergonomic measures. In general, education is effective in increasing knowledge, sensitivity and awareness regarding musculoskeletal discomfort and pain in children as well as in young people.
This report shows risk factors and strategies for preventing MSDs. You can download the full report on the EU-OSHA website.

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